How Safe Are Low Carb Diets?



Low carb diets have become popular due to the fact that they help reduce weight within a short period. Many dieticians advocate reduction in the intake of carbohydrates in order to reduce body weight. Though low carb diets are widely followed, the safety and the efficacy in the long term have not been medically established.

It has been observed that dieticians and medical practitioners have different views about the diet to be followed for losing weight. Some medical physicians are of the opinion that since carbohydrates are a major source of energy, when its intake is reduced, proteins and saturated fats can be taken as an alternative source of energy. The usage of saturated fats, however, exposes the body to heart problems. To digest the excess proteins and fats, the kidney has to work harder which may cause kidney dysfunctions. Calcium deficiency due to poor carb intake can affect the bone and liver functions.

Essential nutrients like vitamins and minerals are obtained from fruits and vegetables, which are missing in a low carb diet. Consequently, an individual following a low carb diet can become deficient in these.

Weight loss due to low carb diets is yo-yo dieting as people tend to fluctuate between weight loss and gain when on these diets. This can cause the skin to relax and contract. Also, when a low carb diet is discontinued, an individual can quickly regain the weight. A professional dietician would always suggest a permanent solution for weight loss that are not just quick fixes but are spread over a longer period to ensure long-term results. It is always better to include an exercise regime along with a balanced diet. Low carb diets should be strictly followed in consultation with a doctor. Relying exclusively on the advice of consultants in weight loss centers that advocate quick weight loss is generally unsafe.

Low Carb Diets provides detailed information on Low Carb Diet, Low Carb Diet Foods, Low Carb Diet Plans, Best Low Carb Diets and more. Low Carb Diets is affiliated with Low Cholesterol Diet.

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